Thursday, June 25, 2015

Convert Milimeters to Inches with Fractions

While surfing the internet today, I realized I have a piece of lumber at home that was recently surfaced to 40 mm. 

"How much is that in inches?" I asked myself.

A quick google came up with this site, and the answer of 1 9/16".

Just put in your mm or cm measurement, and out comes something useful for the shop.  This is handy for those of us in Europe who prefer to use inches.  Also, if you would like to use a plan in the shop that is metric.

12 comments:

  1. I'm in Canada where we convert to metric in the 70s, but I still staunchly stick to inches.
    I long ago banned all traces of metric measures on my tools, I tolerate the odd dual markings (imperial/metric) if I don't have a choices, but for all intend and purpose I work resolutely in Imperial measures. Long live the Queen :-)
    But yes, that conversion comes in handy at time...
    Bob, from the land of failed metric implementation

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    1. I like to keep all of my tools matched up like mortise chisels and plow planes.

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  2. Other side here.

    While some of my tools or in imperial units my shop converted to metric several years ago....One of the best moves I've made, measuring mistakes have been cut to almost never and it is so much quicker....little standing around around scratching my butt trying to figure how long is 2 3/16 + 5 7/8.

    I can understand hanging on to imperial because change is hard but even this old dog learned a new trick.

    ken

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    1. I prefer not to measure anything if I can help it. When I do, I like that inches break down into more useful fractions than centimeters do.

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  3. Metric here, but I like the imperial for being easy to divide up into smaller parts.

    some of my tools are imperial notably auger bits, so there goes. Surprisingly a lot of wood screws are more close to imperial than to metric, even if we've been metric for ages.

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    1. I made a decision to keep my whole shop in inches when possible.

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  4. Yap and Yap, I know, metric is superiors in many ways (you always play with whole numbers) but the biggest headaches always are in the conversion , it is always going to be a close (?) approximation, errors accumulate, rockets blow up at launch, and satellite get lost. Me I'm taking no chance, most of my antique tools are imperial :-)
    Bob, who is fluent metric in my car

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  5. I work with both and I don't mind ;-)

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    1. I think being in Europe and using old tools forces us to at some point.

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  6. Good tip, I'm just not sure what this "plan" thing is that you refer to.

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    1. Did I say that? I rarely use one. ­čśÇ

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